Page extent: 72
ISBN: 9781786821218
Binding: PaperBack

While We're Here

Barney Norris

PaperBack (26 Apr 2017)
£9.99

Eddie and Carol were lovers once, but their lives went in different directions. Now they meet again on a park bench in a town full of memories, and find something still burns between them.

Critics Circle and Offwestend Award-winning playwright and novelist Barney Norris has been heralded as 'one of our most exciting young writers' (Times), 'a rare and precious talent' (Evening Standard), 'a writer of grace and luminosity' (Stage) who is 'fast turning into the quiet voice of Britain' (British Theatre Guide).

Additional Information

ISBN13 9781786821218
Binding PaperBack
Page Extent 72

Reviews

'Playwright Barney Norris has a real gift for shining a light on ordinary lives... Norris combines astute and often comic observation of the minutiae of daily life with more far-reaching questions about the way we use the time "while we're here". The result is bittersweet and quietly moving... a little gem of a play.' Financial Times ★★★★

'a low-key but quietly moving two-hander, that'll have you wistfully wondering what you're doing with your life... Norris is excellent at catching the cadences of everyday conversation...  While We're Here forms a lovely, tender meditation on how quickly time passes, and what we do (or don't do) with it. The dialogue is simply terrific – funny, believable, heart-clenchingly sad – and is animated with great care by both performers. It will make you want to open your heart, to reach out, only connect – oh, and to call your mum.' What's On Stage

'Barney Norris is a heartbreaker. He excels at writing minor-key stories full of regret and unvoiced longing... This is a poignant and subtle piece – one designed to make you want to pick up the phone and call someone close to you, to remind them that they matter, that they’re loved.' The Stage 

'Barney Norris is the young master of the everyday, everyday details and dramas, triumphs and tragedies. The depth and truth of his writing about so-called ‘ordinary lives’ is remarkable.' Evening Standard

‘This small play with a big heart is hardly radical in form, but is constructed with craft and grace… it has a Chekhovian comic sadness and speaks loudly to anyone who fears that they will die alone.’ Lyn Gardner, Guardian