Page extent: 88
ISBN: 9781786821539
Binding: PaperBack

TANK

Breach Theatre

PaperBack (21 Feb 2017)
£9.99

“Come right out with the English, Peter. Don’t even think in your own language. English, all the time!”

In 1965, a researcher lived with a dolphin for ten weeks to try and teach him to speak English – part of a NASA-funded research project into human-animal communication. Condemned by the wider scientific community as an elaborate circus trick, the experiment remains a controversial episode in the space race between the two Cold War superpowers.

Inspired by Margaret’s time with Peter in the Dolphin House, TANK will explore the politics of language, the power of culture – and what happens when you inject a cetacean with LSD.

Additional Information

ISBN13 9781786821539
Binding PaperBack
Page Extent 88

Reviews

'Brutally cutting through media mythmaking, Breach Theatre blend incisive, probing investigation with a shrewd understanding of the power of stories – both challenged and manipulated here to great effect.' What's On Live ★★★★

'Breach Theatre’s Tank is an unsettling, thought-provoking insight into a Space Race era project mired by controversy to this day. Verbatim dialogue from surviving recordings of Lovatt’s lessons is fused with Breach Theatre’s stripped back, deadpan style in an attempt to fill in the gaps and tell the full story.' Reviews Hub

'Facinating. A funny, dark, and strangely dreamy work about humankind’s desire to colonise the other' ★★★★ Time Out

'Cleverly pitched. Dissects what happens when we justify what we do to others in the interests of science, society and maintaining power.' ★★★★ The Guardian

'Wow, is all I can say'  ★★★★ The Times

'Witty but disturbing... brilliant' ★★★★ The Stage

'A raw, joyous psych-rock freakout' ★★★★ The Scotsman

'Tackling that difficult second show with real confidence, Breach Theatre... offer an engaging deadpan satire... This is likely to be the only time you will ever attend a show that features verbatim contributions from a dolphin. Tank’s verbatim element is important, because all verbatim theatre raises questions around who owns and tells a story, how it is edited and how it is received. At one point, there is an attempt to present what we are seeing as a love story, a reminder that all stories can be manipulated.Tank may be about colonisation but it wears such themes with a light touch in a cleverly pitched, often comic, multi-layered show.' Lyn Gardner, The Guardian ★★★★

Winner of a Fringe First Award 2016.

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