Page extent: 64
ISBN: 9781783193448
Binding: PaperBack

Give Me Your Love

Jon Haynes, David Woods

PaperBack (11 Jan 2016)
£9.99

A new play from acclaimed experimental company Ridiculusmus about MDMA assisted therapy for Post Traumatic Stress.

Welcome to the world of war veteran Zach. As the last man standing, Zach has retreated into a tiny dugout under a barrage of hostile fire. His enemies are cunning, using every trick in the book to mess with his mind. Even the landscape is weird: audibly, chemically and most of all physically… it is a cardboard box, in Zach’s kitchen, in Port Talbot. His wife whispers, kindly, that it’s safe to come out. But is it a trap? For if the real enemy is Zach himself then who will win if he loses?

Give Me Your Love is the second instalment of Ridiculusmus’s three-pronged investigation into innovative approaches to mental health. Informed by the latest scientific research, it explores the healing potential in altered states of consciousness.

Additional Information

ISBN13 9781783193448
Binding PaperBack
Page Extent 64

Reviews

'Ridiculusmus at their best in a funny, moving two-hander about PTSD.' The Stage

'There's a long history of MDMA being used therapeutically, and this deceptively simple show from experimental company Ridiculusmus addresses the drug’s possible benefits for people in the grip of post-traumatic stress. It also ponders the stigma around mental illness and challenges received ideas about heroism.' Evening Standard

'Given the fact this show involves one man trapped in a box and another hidden behind a door, ‘Give Me Your Love’ is somewhat of a triumph. We barely see the actors and struggle to hear them, yet there’s something strangely arresting about this latest exploration of mental health from experimental theatre company Ridiculusmus... an intriguingly understated and eerily effective piece of theatre.' Time Out

'Give Me Your Love is like a cross between a Beckett play and a Monty Python sketch. It conveys a strong sense of existential entrapment... Zach is stuck in a cardboard box, in a squalid room, stained and bare; the other characters are either offstage or visually dismembered – and portrays the debilitating realities of PTSD with an off-kilter, often hilarious blend of insight and rapid-fire absurdity... although the ending won't please everyone, it disdains false uplift and leaves you, as it should, questioning how our prejudices feed into the central character's predicament.' Sydney Morning Herald