Eastern European Plays

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  • Global Queer Plays

    Danish Sheikh, Jeton Neziraj, Amahl Khouri, Jean-Luc Lagarce, Zhan Jie, Mariam Bazeed, Santiago Loza

    A unique anthology bringing together stories of queer life from international playwrights, these seven plays showcase the dazzling multiplicity of queer narratives across the
    globe: the absurd, the challenging, and the joyful.

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    £17.99

  • Ágóta Kristóf: Collected Plays

    Ágóta Kristóf, Bart Smet

    Available for the first time in English, this volume is a collection of all nine plays Kristóf wrote; five full length plays and four shorter plays: John and Joe, The Lift Key, A Passing Rat, The Grey Hour or the Last Client, The Monster, The Road, The Epidemic, The Atonement, and Line, of times. Pre-dating her acclaimed novel The Notebook, these plays are a fascinating insight into the development of her writing and ideas.

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    £16.99

  • Staging a Revolution

    Belarus Free Theatre

    The International Contest of Contemporary Drama (ICCD) was set up by Belarus Free Theatre to encourage new writing and to promote Belarusian cultural identity on an international stage with the participation of artists across Europe. This publication is dedicated to promoting the works of the winning playwrights.

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    £16.99

  • I Wish to Die Singing: Voices from the Armenian Genocide

    Neil McPherson

    The Armenian Genocide was the first genocide of the 20th century, perpetrated by the Ottoman Turkish Government against the Armenians, a Christian minority in a Muslim state. One and a half million people died.

    The word 'genocide' itself was invented by Raphael Lemkin in 1943 to describe the events of 1915. Adolf Hitler used the Armenian Genocide as a direct inspiration for the Holocaust during the Second World War.

    To this day, the Turkish government refuses to admit that any genocide ever took place.

    Commemorating the exact centenary of the deportations that began the Armenian Genocide, I Wish To Die Singing – Voices From The Armenian Genocide is a controversial documentary drama uncovering the forgotten secrets and atrocities of a denied genocide – featuring eye-witness reportage, images, music, poetry from Armenia's greatest poets, and verbatim survivors testimonies from one of the greatest historical injustices of all time.

    Read the author's blog piece on researching and writing this play here http://bit.ly/1QAIcWQ Learn More
    £9.99

  • Trash Cuisine & Minsk 2011

    Belarus Free Theatre

    Trash Cuisine is winner of the Impatto Totale Award 2013 at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, 2013.

    Trash Cuisine:

    • Nicolai Khalezin and Natalia Kaliada 
    • Devised by Belarus Free Theatre

    Banned from performing in their own country, Belarus Free Theatre serve up food, music, dance and Shakespeare as they share true stories from inmates, executioners, human rights lawyers and families of the executed. This provocative and urgent play pierces the imagination with moments of the darkest humour as it challenges capital punishment in our contemporary world, where 95 countries still carry out the death penalty.

    Minsk 2011 (A Reply to Kathy Acker):

    • Devised and written by Belarus Free Theatre
    • Dramaturgy by Vladimir Shcherban

    If scars are sexy, Minsk must be the sexiest city in the world...Strip clubs, underground raves and gay pride parades pulse beneath the surface of a city, where sexuality is twisted by oppression. A love letter to a home that exiles those willing to fight for it, Minsk, 2011 celebrates and mourns a land that has lost its way. ...

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    £9.99

  • Remembrance Day

    Aleksey Scherbak

    Can you be a hero if you fought for Nazi Germany?

    The Latvians who fought for the Third Reich and halted the Red Army parade as heroes every year through the streets of Riga. As a growing number of young Russians campaign to halt the 'fascist' march, their Latvian counterparts join the veterans in commemoration. 

    When teenager Anya becomes a political activist, her father's attempts to calm the situation stir up a storm of extremist patriotism. Remembrance Day takes an look at the fight for the political soul of Latvia.

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    £9.99

  • Our Class

    Tadeusz Slobodzianek

    Your classmate is like your family. Maybe even more important than that. A group of schoolchildren, Jewish and Catholic, declare their ambitions: one to be a fireman, one a film star, one a pilot, another a doctor. They are learning the ABC. This is Poland, 1925. As the children grow up, their country is torn apart by invading armies, first Soviet and then Nazi. Internal grievances deepen as fervent nationalism develops; friends betray each other; violence escalates. Until these ordinary people carry out an extraordinary and monstrous act that darkly resonates to this day.

    Polish playwright, Tadeusz Slobodzianek, confronts his country’s involvement in the atrocities of the last century and follows the one-time classmates – amidst the weddings, parades, births, deaths, emigrations and reconciliations – into the next.

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    £11.99

  • The Family Plays

    Joakim Pirinen, Natalia Vorozhbit

    Two plays from opposite ends of Europe, each depicting family life: both slyly subversive, both quietly terrifying.
    In The Good Family by Swedish writer Joakim Pirinen, we are comfortably off, sexually satisfied, liberal, liberated and pretty much perfect. Everything is wonderful and probably always will be.
    In The Khomenko Family Chronicles by Ukranian writer Natalia Vorozhbit, two parents tell their bedbound son the romantic tale of how they met and married - a light-hearted stroll down memory lane that takes us past Chernobyl and the Twin Towers.

    Translated by leading British playwright Gregory Motton and poet Sasha Dugdale, they were first performed as The Family Plays: A Double Bill at the Royal Court in 2007. Learn More
    £12.99

  • Kebab

    Gianina Carbunariu

    Having moved to Dublin to start a new life, the young Romanian, Madalina, finds herself working in a kebab shop...until her boyfriend Voicu suggests a more lucrative, if not altogether savoury, line of work. Her new career brings her into contact - quite literally - with a Romanian art student, Bogdan, and the three of them find a way of living and working together. Their uneasy, messy menage-a-trois persists until Madalina decides to choose between her two men...


    Kebab explores some of the harsher realities of immigration and what people are willing to give up in the hope of a better life.

    Kebab opened at the Royal Court Theatre in September 2007.

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    £9.99

  • The Stonewatcher

    János Hay

    Géza is an autistic twenty-five-year-old living with his mother in a small village. Everyone around him wishes him well, and his old friends even hire him to work in a quarry to give some meaning to his life. But since none of them can understand the rules of his special, closed universe, their well-intentioned actions almost destroy him.

    János Hay's play, partly influenced by Beckett, is written in a simple, ballad-like style, in a freshly minted language that is laced with a unique brand of humour. This version is from a literal translation by László Bíró and László Upor and is part of the National Theatre's Channels (Hungary) season of rehearsed readings performed in the Cottesloe Theatre in June 2004.

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    £9.99

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